Edmodo Snapshot

Edmodo Snapshot functions exactly like its name; it is a snapshot of where your students are at any given time in relation to mastery of the Common Core Standards. Snapshot provides ready made “micro-assessments” that students take online through their Edmodo accounts. The tests are graded automatically, and instant data is provided for the teacher. The program went live recently, and it’s an exciting addition to all the wonderful features Edmodo already offers.

Wednesday morning I used what Edmodo suggested for my first 12 question Snapshot “test,” and the standards involved were RL.7.1 (citing textual evidence), RI.7.6 (author’s point of view), and RI.7.10 (reading at grade level).

First I’ll discuss Snapshot and then I’ll share my takeaway.

Discussion:

Snapshot is really easy to use. The teacher logs into Edmodo and clicks on the icon of a magnifying glass with a checkmark on the left hand side of the webpage. The teacher picks the group who will receive the test, the grade level, the amount of time to be given, and the Common Core Standards to be assessed. I haven’t played around with this a lot yet, but it seems you can make the assessment as short or long as you want.

Screen Shot 2014-08-12 at 10.11.17 PM

When the students log into Edmodo, they are notified of a Snapshot assessment they can take. Once my students clicked “Take Snapshot,” they had 20 minutes to complete the assessment. (That was the default amount of time, but I could have shortened it or lengthened it if I chose.) If for any reason the students click out of the assessment, they will not be allowed access again–this happened in a couple of cases. Most of the students finished the test, and only a few ran out of time.

Teachers have access to the questions students will view before the test is taken. I’m sure a lot of teachers like this feature, but I’d caution using it too much since we don’t want to “teach to the test.

As I walked around the classroom, I noticed that the tests were not the same, which is great because it’s very easy for students to look at other screens due to the group formation in which they sit. Snapshot’s text size was small, but the 1:1 devices make it possible to zoom in and out of the webpage.

My takeaway:

Snapshot is an amazing tool. I can envision using this throughout the year to gauge my students’ mastery of the standards. Whenever I teach a unit on a specific standard (or two), Snapshot is a great way of assessing whether the student grasped the concept.

Screen Shot 2014-08-12 at 10.12.52 PM

Snapshot breaks the data into three categories: “Meets the Standard,” “Borderline,” and “Behind” (There’s also “Incomplete” for when the student doesn’t finish the Snapshot in time.) My students did well on standard RI.7.10 (reading at grade level), with most of them meeting the standard or receiving a “Borderline” score. RL.7.1 (citing textual evidence) was similar, but my students did very poorly on RI.7.6 (author’s point of view). This is very valuable information, and I’m glad I know it. The speed with which the students can take the test, and the speed in which they’re graded, gives me immediate feedback, making Snapshot the best way to conduct an efficient formative assessment in class.

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Many teachers may not like that the tests are already made, but I think it’s wonderful. Instead of using valuable PLC time creating assessments, teachers can instead mine the student data for all it’s worth and create effective lesson plans to address student need.

The best thing about Snapshot, however, is that it doesn’t bog the teacher down in too much data. The program simply shows whether the student needs help–and the truth of the matter is–that’s all I need to know. I didn’t become a teacher to print out reams of paper that contain meaningless data that will either go in a binder or recycling bin. I became a teacher to positively affect lives and teach meaningful content.

Edmodo is really firing on all cylinders right now. If they were selling stock, I’d invest.

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16 thoughts on “Edmodo Snapshot

  1. Thanks for the review! More teachers and students will have the chance to try Snapshot as we continue to roll it out across the US in the coming weeks. We hope they love it as much as you do. But even more so, we hope that in our own small way we can help you positively affect lives. Please let us know how we can help.

      • Thank you for the snapshot summary. Very helpful! If Edmodo hasn’t already started incorporating Canadian standards into snapshot, then I would be more than happy to help prepare this. Canadian teaching standards/expectations are slightly different than US standards. Also, I still think snapshots should have the freedom to be stored by students in any media form they choose. Teachers should still quickly evaluate the snapshot (regardless of the media format presented) using a simple classlist/checklist provided (Headings: Got It or More Practice Needed).

      • Hi Andrew,

        That sounds like a great idea! The Edmodo team is very responsive if you contact them via Edmodo or Twitter. Incorporating Canadian standards into Snapshot would benefit a lot of students!

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  3. I am in agreement with everything you stated here. I found Snapshot to be an easy to use formative assessment tool that I will definitely be using and sharing with other faculty at my school!

  4. This post help other teachers realize why they should use snapshot as a quick assessment tool to see if students grasp the concepts. Snapshot also breaks the data into 3 categories “Meet the Standard,” Borderline,” and “Behind”, this will help teachers receive data about their students. Teachers will love the idea of students will be able immediate feedback for snapshot.

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  6. Tahnks for your insight to using Snapshot. I gave it a try last year. I kept the assessments small and only assessed one or two standards as you had mentioned. This created nice short assessments that students were able to complete in a reasonable amount of time and helped me see who was mastering content and who needed more differentiated instruction.

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